Raleigh Rambles

John Dancy-Jones at large!

BOO KOF KNO WLE DGE – Ray J’s Zen Icons

John Held presents on mail art at BMC conference

The BMC conference in October 2010 at UNC-A offered a wide range of wonderful BMC nuggets, but having put off posting about it so long, I’m sticking with the Ray Johnson material which is always my main priority.  A big highlight was John Held’s mail art show and talk about mail art and the early days of the NY Correspondance School.

Ray’s inscrutable, radical but disarming approach to art has clearly led to a rich but fairly specialized body of critical writing and thinking about his work, immeshed but not entangled in the large “fan” following evident online.  The main points of the former relate to Black Mountain College influences, the main thrust of the latter is mail art and performance art.  Ray did not appear to observe such distinctions, but one thing I gained in the last two years of learning from BMCM+AC venues for Ray J work is that Ray Johnson was a major artist in the tradition of DuChamp, Miro, and Klee. Slowly, a body of academic work is relating his truly astonishing accomplishments  both in the mainstream tradition of painting and his unique and irresistible gift and mandate: “Steal beauty from the mundane.”

The conference presentations offered delicious details about Ray’s process. Sebastian Matthews provided the quote above as he compared Ray’s obsession with found images to the “image collage” of Frank O’Hara poem “A Step away From Them.”  Sebastian also elucidated with great insight about Ray’s Moticos, the secret embeddings and abrupt juxtapositions that Ray created in response to his environment.  For Sebastian, Ray is a zen master of art, always indirect though immediate, balancing inward and outward by being aware of the act of being aware.  Like O’Hara, a New York School poet, Ray scoured the city for images that enabled him to subvert and reconnect meanings.

Louly Peacock described how Ray subverted Pop Art (and pre-dated Warhol with celebrity portraits), teasing the major figures as in labeling Pollock “Action Jackson,” a nomiker that stuck.  Her survey of phallic imagery in Ray’s work made her yet again the most entertaining speaker at the conference.  Julie Thomson helped frame Ray’s performance art in showing the relationship between Ray and George Brecht of Fluxus fame, who” began to imagine a more modest, slyly provocative kind of art that would focus attention on the perceptual and cognitive experience of the viewer.”  Brecht created “instructions for a toward event,” and along with Alan Kaprow paved the way for the Happenings – not to speak of Ray’s Nothings.  Johanna Gosse portrayed Ray as a renegade of the gallery art world, deliberately obfuscating the market process, living in the “osmotic fluid flow” of daily aesthetic experiences, where the experience is the end, the process is the product.

Kate Dempsey revealed more of her discoveries about Albers’ fascination with pre-Columbian culture and how the Mayan hieroglyphs – still mysteries at the time- helped develop Ray’s sensitivity to text as an image source.  Ray retained a geometric precision even as he evolved out of painting, and his love of codes, puns and multiple meanings ties together his early and late work.

The best insights into Ray were to be found at the talk by John Held while sorrounded by his mail art show.  He walks the walk with mail art to this day and had much to share.  He confirmed something also mentioned in the panel discussions – Ray’s moticos were featured in the very first Village Voice in 1955.  He also described the importance of the 1970 correspondence art exhibit at The Whitney.  He made it convincingly clear that Ray’s correspondence art was “not about the postal system,” but about “how you communicate aesthetics over a long distance.”  Held stated that “Ray was building a community,’ and used no judgment or selection with his mailing lists. 

John Held's mail Art Show, BMC conference at UNC-A, October 2010

The mail art show he exhibited had 170 entries from over 40 countries.  It was impressive, entertaining, and a great tribute to the ongoing spirit of the NY Correspondance School.  Ray Johnson continues to generate not only interest and academic attention, but exciting participatory tributes and art directly tracable to his genius.

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One fun event I should share about from last fall is the presentation of a new BMC Wall in downtown Asheville.  A large mural and several interesting installations grace an alley just off Broadway.

                                 

BMC Wall lower detail

Several of the writers mentioned above are featured with Ray Johnson articles in an upcoming issue of the

Journal of Black Mountain College Studies

Sebastian Matthew’s Ray J show essay with lots of Ray J images!

Raleigh Rambles Black Mountain page 

Raleigh Rambles Ray Johnson page

 

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August 12, 2011 - Posted by | art, Black Mountain, Ray Johnson | , ,

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